Android Q will have Face ID and screen recording

Last year, Android Pie launched to tepid applause. At the time, most Android users were still waiting for the previous year’s Android Oreo update. Half a year later, the same story continues. Android Pie has only started to trickle down to consumers within the past few months.

Still, despite Android’s abysmal distribution, life goes on. Google is already developing Android Q. More details are gradually coming out as we near the traditional launch period. Currently, the early build has confirmed a system-wide dark mode.

 

Now, a newer build has revealed more upcoming features. Based on 9to5Google’s digging, Android Q will come with facial recognition, screen recording, and easier emergency contacting.

Facial recognition has been a feature for some Android phones already. Sadly, Android’s current version relies on image processing: scanning the image of a face, rather than the face itself. As such, the version is easily bypassed by pointing the correct photo at it.

Based on the new APK, Android Q will finally implement support for a more secure dot projector. Currently, Apple already uses the technology for its Face ID feature. Although Apple is already the first, Google’s own implementation will surely increase the system’s security.

Additionally, Android Q will have improved screen recording. Usually, Android phones need third-party software to record the screen. Only a handful of phones can record using pre-installed software.

Finally, a more accessible emergency contact button is coming to Android. Right now, the button lies in the lock screen. Its current location is still the most tactical, offering a discreet strategy during emergency situations. However, the button is hard to access if you’re already on the home screen. As such, Android Q will add another button on the home screen.

In the coming months, Android Q will likely launch more revolutionary features. However, today’s leaks are already painting an optimistic future for Android.

Domain name registrations were free till 1995

Nobody really knew what the internet was capable of back then and this was a huge opportunity for people to own all kinds of do domain names. It was in 1995 that a company called Network Solutions was granted the rights to charge people for domain names. And it was expensive too: prices typically started at $100 per two years of registration.

As much as 30 per cent of this was a fee that went to the National Science Foundation to create an ‘Internet Intellectual Infrastructure Fund’. This fee was later reversed in 1997, bringing the charge down to $70 for two years

 

https://akbansal.in/92-per-cent-of-the-worlds-currency-is-digital/

92 per cent of the world’s currency is digital

akbansal.in

Only an estimated 8 per cent of currency globally is physical money.

Banks store electronically too and the 92 per cent includes all kinds of transactions done using credit/debit cards and wire transfers. Might be a good idea to revisit all those hacker movies where a nerdy computer hacker manages to siphon billions off in just a few minutes.

All the black money piles come from within this 8 per cent. This is a fair estimate that economists seem to agree on though, not an exact figure. This low percentage seems absurd but when you stop to think, it makes sense considering that most large transactions are done electronically anyway.

Linking Activities with Intents

1. Using Android Studio, create a new Android project with an empty Activity named MainActivity; name the project UsingIntent.
2. Right-click your package name under the app>>app>>src>>main>>java folder in the Project Files windows and select New ➪ Java Class
3. Name the new class SecondActivity and click OK.
4. Add the bolded statements from the following code to the AndroidManifest.xml file. Be sure to change all instances of “com.akbansal” to whatever package name your project is using.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" package="com.akbansal.usingintent">

<application
android:allowBackup="true" android:icon="@mipmap/ic_launcher" android:label="@string/app_name" android:supportsRtl="true" android:theme="@style/AppTheme">
<activity android:name=".MainActivity">
<intent-filter>
<action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

<category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
</intent-filter>
</activity>
<activity android:name=".SecondActivity" >
<intent-filter >
<action android:name="com.akbansal.usingintent.SecondActivity" />
<category android:name="android.intent.category.DEFAULT" />
</intent-filter>
</activity>
</application>

</manifest>

5. Make a copy of the activity_main.xml file (in the res/layout folder) by right-clicking it and selecting Copy. Then right-click the res/layout folder and select Paste. Name the file activity_second.xml.
6. Modify the activity_second.xml file as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools" android:layout_width="match_parent" android:layout_height="match_parent"
android:paddingBottom="@dimen/activity_vertical_margin" android:paddingLeft="@dimen/activity_horizontal_margin" android:paddingRight="@dimen/activity_horizontal_margin" android:paddingTop="@dimen/activity_vertical_margin" tools:context="com.akbansal.usingintent.SecondActivity">

<TextView
android:layout_width="wrap_content" android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:text="This is the Second Activity!" />
</RelativeLayout>

 

7. In the SecondActivity.java file, add the bolded statements from the following code:

package com.akbansal.usingintent;

import android.app.Activity; import android.os.Bundle;

public class SecondActivity extends Activity {
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); setContentView(R.layout.activity_second);
}

}

8. Add the bolded lines in the following code to the activity_main.xml file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools" android:layout_width="match_parent" android:layout_height="match_parent" android:paddingBottom="@dimen/activity_vertical_margin" android:paddingLeft="@dimen/activity_horizontal_margin" android:paddingRight="@dimen/activity_horizontal_margin" android:paddingTop="@dimen/activity_vertical_margin" tools:context="com.akbansal.usingintent.MainActivity">

<TextView
android:layout_width="wrap_content" android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:text="Main Activity!" android:id="@+id/textView" />

<Button
android:layout_width="wrap_content" android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:text="Display second activity" android:onClick="onClick" android:id="@+id/button" android:layout_below="@+id/textView" android:layout_alignParentStart="true" android:layout_marginTop="56dp" />
</RelativeLayout>

10. Press Shift+F9 to debug the application on the Android emulator. When the first activity is loaded, click the button and the second activity also loads

   

Creating a Blog

The first step in creating a blog is to create a name.Blogger allows you to change your blog’s
address once it is setup, it is important to take time to think about a name before getting started. The
name of your blog should be related to the purpose of your blog, whether it’s a personal blog about
yourself in general, goals you have accomplished, a journey you are on, or a professional blog about a
service or product you provide. If you were blogging about yourself, you may use your name as the blog
name (and therefore part of your blog address). For example, if your name was “AK BANSAL” and you used
that as the name of your blog, then Blogger would assign your blog address as akbansal.blogspot.com.

 

You will be creating a new Blogger blog:

1. With your Internet browser open, visit blogger.com.
2. You will come to Blogger’s home page

3. Click the Create a Blog button.
4. On the next screen create a new Google account

 

Note: If you already have a Google account, go back to Blogger’s home page and enter your Google username and password at the top right area of the screen labeled “Sign in to use Blogger with your Google account.” Click Sign In.

Displaying a Progress Dialog

1. Using the Activity101 project created earlier in this chapter, make sure you are using the Material theme in the AndroidManifest.xml file. Be sure to change all instances of “com.akbansal” to whatever package name your project is using.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools" package="com.akbansal.activity101">

<application
android:allowBackup="true" android:icon="@mipmap/ic_launcher" android:label="@string/app_name" android:supportsRtl="true" android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Material">
<activity android:name=".MainActivity">

<intent-filter>
<action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

<category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
</intent-filter>
</activity>
</application>

</manifest>

2. Add the bolded statements from the following code to the MainActivity.java file:

package com.akbansal.activity101; import android.app.Activity;
import android.app.ProgressDialog; import android.os.CountDownTimer; import android.os.Bundle;


public class MainActivity extends Activity {

ProgressDialog progressDialog;
@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

}

public void onStart()
{
super.onStart();
progressDialog = ProgressDialog.show(this,"Please Wait", "Processing...",true);
CountDownTimer timer = new CountDownTimer(3000,1000) { @Override
public void onTick(long millisUntilFinished) {

}

@Override
public void onFinish() { progressDialog.dismiss();
}
}.start();
}
}

3. Press Shift+F9 to debug the application on the Android emulator. You see the progress dialog, as shown in It disappears after three seconds.

Setting Breakpoints

Breakpoints are a mechanism by which you can tell Android Studio to temporarily pause execution of your code, which allows you to examine the condition of your application. This means that you can check on the values of variables in your application while you are debugging it.

Creating a New Project in Android Studio

Opened Android Studio, you see should a screen that looks like..

 

The Android Studio welcome screen contains an option for you to open existing projects that you might have already created in Android It also presents options for opening a project from VCS, and importing projects from other IDEs, such as Eclipse.

  1. Click the Start a New Android Studio Project option from the Android Studio welcome screen. You should now see the Create New Project screen , which enables you to configure some of the basic options

 

  1. The next screen allows you to select the form factor on which your application will run . For the purposes of this book, you exclusively use Phone and Tablet. The version of Android is Android N (or Nougat, depending on the version of the SDK you downloaded. As of the writing of this book, the name was officially announced as Nougat, but the SDK was still labeled N).
  2. The other options on this screen allow you to create applications that run on Android Wear, Android Auto, and the elusive Google Glass. If you are feeling adventurous after reading this book, feel free to try some of these other application form factor options. For now, make sure to select Phone and Tablet and Android N and click Next to continue.The next screen is the Add an Activity to Mobile screen, as shown in This screen is a helper that adds commonly used features to your project at the time the project is created.

The next screen is the Add an Activity to Mobile screen.This screen is a helper that adds commonly used features to your project at the time the project is created